6 Leadership Books of 2019

We all have a common resolution for every new year: to read. Yet a few of us able to keep the consistency and commitment it requires. Once addicted, books are better than anything you may need to be high in life.

To help it out, here is my list of most anticipated books of 2019. Buckle up, make a wish list and read them one at a time:

Loonshots by Safi Bahcall

In “Loonshots,” physicist and biotech entrepreneur Safi Bahcall analyzes the ways groups will suddenly shift from embracing radical change to resisting it, whether that’s on a corporate project, in politics, or even a traffic jam.

The book has already earned high praise, including from Nobel laureate economist Daniel Kahneman, who said its “convincing analysis” makes it a can’t-miss read.

FROM THE GROUND UP by Howard Schultz

From the longtime CEO and chairman of Starbucks, a bold, dramatic work about the new responsibilities that leaders, businesses, and citizens share in American society today—as viewed through the intimate lens of one man’s life and work. 

TRILLION DOLLAR COACH by Eric Schmidt, Jonathan Rosenberg and Alan Eagle:

Silicon Valley’s best-kept secret is… a former football coach named Bill Campbell, who became so indispensable that Steve Jobs went on a weekly Sunday walk with him and the Google founders said they wouldn’t have made it without him

POSSIBLE MINDS: TWENTY FIVE WAYS OF LOOKING AT AI by John Brockman

Science world luminary John Brockman assembles twenty-five of the most important scientific minds, people who have been thinking about the field artificial intelligence for most of their careers, for an unparalleled round-table examination about mind, thinking, intelligence and what it means to be human.

THE INFINITE GAME by Simon Sinek

In The Infinite Game, Sinek applies game theory to explore how great businesses achieve long-lasting success. He finds that building long-term value and healthy, enduring growth – that playing the infinite game – is the only thing that matters to your business.

NINE LIES ABOUT WORK by Marcus Buckingham and Ashley Goodall

“This is one of the most provocative, lucidly written books I’ve read on work,” says Adam Grant, Professor at Warton. “Be prepared to throw your strategic plan out the window and become well-lopsided instead of well-rounded.”

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Five PRINCIPLES of Ray Dalio You Should Radically Embrace

Ray Dalio is an American billionaire investor, hedge fund manager, and philanthropist. But what strikes me the most is his remarkable ability to think abstractly. He is a genius of devising strategic and radically practical ways of approaching a problem and to figure out the solution effortlessly.

Ray is amongst my favourite authors of the era. I highly recommend everyone to read his book: PRINCIPLES. Also, you may love to follow his inspirational posts on LinkedIn and other social platforms. Here are 5 magnificent PRINCIPLES I have chosen to share:

“If both parties are peers, it’s appropriate to argue. But if one person is clearly more knowledgeable than the other, it is preferable for the less knowledgeable person to approach the more knowledgeable one as a student and for the more knowledgeable one to act as a teacher. Doing this well requires you to understand the concept of believability. I define believable people as those who have repeatedly and successfully accomplished the thing in question—who have a strong track record with at least three successes—and have great explanations of their approach when probed.”

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“The answer doesn’t have to be in your head; you can look outside yourself. If you’re truly looking at things objectively, you must recognize that the probability of you always having the best answer is small and that, even if you have it, you can’t be confident that you do before others test you. So it is invaluable to know what you don’t know. Ask yourself: Am I seeing this just through my own eyes? If so, then you should know that you’re terribly handicapped.” 

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“Most people are reluctant to take in information that is inconsistent with what they have already concluded. When I ask why, a common answer is: “I want to make up my own mind.” These people seem to think that considering opposing views will somehow threaten their ability to decide what they want to do. Nothing could be further from the truth. Taking in others’ perspectives in order to consider them in no way reduces your freedom to think independently and make your own decisions. It will just broaden your perspective as you make them.”

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“Most people make bad decisions because they are so certain that they’re right that they don’t allow themselves to see the better alternatives that exist. Radically open-minded people know that coming up with the right questions and asking other smart people what they think is as important as having all the answers. They understand that you can’t make a great decision without swimming for a while in a state of “not knowing.” That is because what exists within the area of “not knowing” is so much greater and more exciting than anything any one of us knows.”

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“Look at the patterns of your mistakes and identify at which step in the 5-Step Process you typically fail. Ask others for their input too, as nobody can be fully objective about themselves.”

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Young & Productive: Focus in Social Disruption

Speaking to young minds is an exceptional experience, fiercely energetic and eager to learn. They unusually figure out the directive path with steak eye & always curious to question. It happened to be at Lovely Professional University last month while speaking to around 400 grad students.

Today the world is evolving in an entirely different way. While it is modified to interact socially with the personification of digital, emotions are reshaping. Bombardment of over-information has kept people busy and ignorant to what really needed to learn and what should be avoided entirely. Just feeding our mind with overload doesn’t mean to be a worth of knowledge. It is the biggest challenge for gen-next how to organize the information and filter it as per its significance. Posting on Facebook about changing the world doesn’t help, apart from ‘virtual contentment,’ which is a new kind of disguise.

To push forward and challenging the status quo needs conventional but intelligent approach, books are still brilliant regarding information dissemination and logically reason the process of thinking. The Internet is helping disastrously, not because it is bad, but it has made to engage people smartly in a useless way and to make money out of it. I, somehow, find it better to disengage uniquely by uninstalling social media apps and login via laptop only. Just to keep a smartphone nearby, decreases the efficiency of a human brain by 10%.

There is a lot more needed to change the world, and the good news is we, all, are blessed with the ability to do so. Figure out, what is really important and how should it can be achieved & how really it is going to contribute to making a difference. Start it with a random act of kindness and develop the ideas of future, involve everyone without distinguishing, read WHY NATIONS FAIL by Daron Acemoglu & James A. Robinson.

Relying on others fail people more frequently than to get up and take the baton of responsibility, to put more than required and constantly. There is no innovation yet so effective, to make a human more capable against his willingness to dream and work hard to achieve.

P.S. Blog is not aligned to my core profession but human-factor is the basis of existence.